Category: Kyle Keefer

Kyle Keefer: Utter Dullards

Kyle Keefer, The New Testament as Literature: A Very Short Introduction (OUP, 2008), 25-26. The characterization of the disciples in Mark’s gospel is shocking in its condescension; the disciples are complete and utter dullards. One scene in particular makes this point. Mark narrates two stories of… Continue Reading “Kyle Keefer: Utter Dullards”

Kyle Keefer: The Gospel Writers Were Artists

Kyle Keefer, The New Testament as Literature: A Very Short Introduction (OUP, 2008), 19. A reader who approaches the gospels looking for a factual, objective report of Jesus will inevitably be frustrated. The gospel writers resemble artists and/or polemicists more than journalists because they select… Continue Reading “Kyle Keefer: The Gospel Writers Were Artists”

Kyle Keefer: Reading John and Mark Together

Kyle Keefer, The New Testament As Literature: A Very Short Introduction (OUP, 2008), 108. Reading these two gospels [i.e. the Gospel of John and the Gospel of Mark] together presents a series of dilemmas. Could both of these be true? Is one more historical and… Continue Reading “Kyle Keefer: Reading John and Mark Together”

Kyle Keefer: John’s Portrayal of Jesus versus Mark’s

Kyle Keefer, The New Testament as Literature: A Very Short Introduction (OUP, 2008), 107. In contrast to Mark’s portrayal, John’s Jesus seems strikingly stoic with regard to his death. In fact, John’s Jesus seems to peer into Mark’s garden scene only to mock Jesus’ prayer.… Continue Reading “Kyle Keefer: John’s Portrayal of Jesus versus Mark’s”