Category: ‘The Gospel on the Margins’

Michael Kok: John Mark as a Composite Creation of the Author of Acts

Michael J. Kok, The Gospel on the Margins: The Reception of Mark in the Second Century (Fortpress Press, 2015), 158-159. The John Mark of the book of Acts is a composite creation, the result of harmonizing the earlier accounts of Mark as a Pauline coworker… Continue Reading “Michael Kok: John Mark as a Composite Creation of the Author of Acts”

Michael Kok: Hinderance to Petrine Authorship of 1 Peter

Michael J. Kok, The Gospel on the Margins: The Reception of Mark in the Second Century (Fortress Press, 2015), 136. The Greek [of 1 Peter] is not the singular hindrance to Petrine authorship. It seems peculiar for the historical Cephas to address a predominantly non-Jewish… Continue Reading “Michael Kok: Hinderance to Petrine Authorship of 1 Peter”

Michael Kok: We Don’t Know What The Gospels Were Called In The Early Second Century

Michael J. Kok, The Gospel on the Margins: The Reception of Mark in the Second Century (Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press, 2015), 67-68. The titular usage of εὐαγγέλιον may have predated Marcion, but Koester established his case that it was not widespread in the first half of… Continue Reading “Michael Kok: We Don’t Know What The Gospels Were Called In The Early Second Century”

Michael Kok: The Weight of Petrine Authority

Michael J. Kok, The Gospel on the Margins: The Reception of Mark in the Second Century (Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press, 2015), 9-10, 11. Evidently the weight of Petrine authority did not compel an active readership of Mark. The reason for this limited use may lie in… Continue Reading “Michael Kok: The Weight of Petrine Authority”