https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FuiOLNLVhyc&t=45s Texts discussed: Genesis 1:26, 3:22, 11:7; 1 Kings 22:19-23; Job 1:6, 38:7; Psalm 82:1. Recommended reading: Michael D. Coogan, The Old Testament: A Historical and Literary Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures, third edition (Oxford University Press, 2014), 38.Mark S. Smith, The Priestly Vision of Genesis 1 (Fortress Press, 2010).

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To see other posts in this series, please go to the series’ page. So far in our examination of Ray Comfort’s Scientific Facts in the Bible[1] we have observed that Comfort has been wrong on just about everything. Not only is his exegesis of biblical texts definitionally eisegetical, but he has a lackluster understanding of basic scientific... Continue Reading →

I don't do a whole lot with my YouTube channel but I really ought to change that. So this is (hopefully) the first of many videos offering my amateurish answers to various biblical studies related questions over at Quora. My goal is to keep these videos short and informative (of course, that was my plan... Continue Reading →

So I decided to host my first livestream discussion and did so with Chris H., a brilliant guy who has an almost encyclopedic knowledge of the Hebrew Bible and its relationship to Ancient Near Eastern cultures. We talked about the Gospel of Mark, the Pentateuch, the Canaanite pantheon, textual criticism, the Sea Myth, and so... Continue Reading →

I was finally able to listen to part 2 of "Pete ruins Exodus" over at the podcast The Bible for Normal People. As usual, great material looking at the beginning stages of Moses' call to Egypt, including that bizarre scene in Exodus 4:24-26. The next installment of Koine Greek's reading of the Gospel of Mark... Continue Reading →

The Weekly Roundup – 6.21.19

@andrewmarkhenry of the YouTube channel Religion for Breakfast recently published a short video on the number 666 that appears in Revelation 13:18. Following most scholars, Henry notes that the number is likely an example of gematria, the practice of using the numerical values of the letters in one's name to come up with a value... Continue Reading →

Candida Moss (University of Birmingham) wrote a piece back in March on Apollonius, the miracle-working son of God that is often compared to Jesus. In it Moss, a prolific writer and scholar, observes that many in the ancient Mediterannean were considered the son of this or that God and that the miracles of Jesus "weren't completely unprecedented."... Continue Reading →

"When Jesus calls Herod Antipas a 'fox' (Luke 13:32), most modern European readers will automatically think this means he considered Herod to be particularly clever or craft....The same association would naturally have occurred to a Greek reader in the 1st century. In Greek literature, the fox is proverbially a crafty animal. In Jewish literature, however,... Continue Reading →

"To be clear, some religious people evaluate their subjective experience as a piece of the evidential pie without taking this strong of a stance – but I want to address those who attempt to build atop the 'unshakable' ground of religious experience.  The epistemology illustrated creates a host of problems.  If taken seriously, it is... Continue Reading →

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