The Weekly Roundup – 9.27.19

Dr. Josh Bowen of the Digital Hammurabi duo released a video not too long ago explaining Daniel 9 in its historical context, specifically the 70 weeks. Many Christians see the text as a prophecy about Jesus but this doesn't seem to be a natural fit at all and is likely about such characters as the... Continue Reading →

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It's back! The Weekly Roundup has returned from its hiatus since earlier this summer. Since I was responsible for the August 2019 Biblical Studies Carnival, I suspended work on the Roundup to prepare for that. But that has been submitted and so I'll resume the Roundup! Enjoy! New Testament scholar Michael Kok (The Gospel on... Continue Reading →

To see other posts in this series, please go to the series’ page. So far in our examination of Ray Comfort’s Scientific Facts in the Bible[1] we have observed that Comfort has been wrong on just about everything. Not only is his exegesis of biblical texts definitionally eisegetical, but he has a lackluster understanding of basic scientific... Continue Reading →

The story of Jonah found in the book which bears his name is one of the best known in all the Hebrew Bible. Unwilling to warn the Assyrian capital of Nineveh of coming judgment, Jonah stows away onto a ship that is going the opposite direction of the city. When Yahweh hurls " a great... Continue Reading →

Evangelical Eisegesis: A Dalliance with Daniel, part 1

"Fulfilled prophecies are what distinguish the Bible from other holy texts and are evidence of direct revelations by God." - SJ Thomason.1 In a bid to demonstrate the superiority of Christianity and the significance of Jesus of Nazareth, pop-apologists often appeal to so-called prophecies found in the Hebrew scriptures that are "fulfilled" in the events... Continue Reading →

The Weekly Roundup – 11.2.18

Check these out, comrades! Twitter user @bibhistctxt continues his series over at his blog on ancient Israelite origins in "Israelite Origins: Late Date Exodus." The "late date" for the Exodus is sometime during the 13th century BCE, before 1207 and after 1270 or so. I briefly addressed some of the issues involved last year in... Continue Reading →

Pete Enns on Ecclesiastes

Old Testament scholar Pete Enns recently did a podcast episode on his The Bible for Normal People where he discussed the curious book of Ecclesiastes. Enns doesn't shy away from the rather bleak outlook on life that Ecclesiastes seems to present. Life is absurd so far as Qoheleth is concerned and whatever God throws your way... Continue Reading →

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