Chuck Norris and the Prophet Jeremiah: Kipp Davis on Jeremiah’s Reputation in the Dead Sea Scrolls

Back in 2016, scholar of the Dead Sea Scrolls Kipp Davis (PhD, University of Manchester) gave a lecture on the prophet Jeremiah that discusses the ancient figure’s reputation in literature other than the canonical book that bears his name, particularly in the DSS. The talk, “Forging Reputations of National Icons: Chuck Norris and the Prophet Jeremiah,” opens... Continue Reading →

Yale Bible Study on First Isaiah

Those readers acquainted with biblical scholarship know that there is a general consensus that the book of Isaiah was not entirely penned by the eighth century BCE prophet. That the book underwent some kind of editing is virtually undisputed. For example, chs. 36-39 contain material lifted directly from the Deuteronomistic History (i.e. 2 Kings 18-20),... Continue Reading →

“Out of the Strong Came Sweetness” – Bees in Carcasses

I’ve recently started reading Robert Fagles’ translation of Virgil’s  Aeneid[1] for the first time,[2] beginning with the introduction to it written by the late classicist Bernard Knox. Knox traces Virgil’s works, beginning with his Eclogues, moving on to the Georgics, and concluding with the Aeneid. Concerning the Georgics, Knox notes that it is divided into four books: the first concerns farmers,... Continue Reading →

Bart Ehrman: The Isaian Suffering Servant

Bart D. Ehrman, Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2020), 113. Another reason for thinking Isaiah 53 does not refer to just one person, the future messiah who would die for sins, is that the passage describes the suffering of the servant as a past event, not future:... Continue Reading →

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