"All translations of great works are of course no more than approximations of the original, in some places happy ones, in some necessarily imperfect. But respecting the sheer physicality of the Bible’s language together with a stylistic decorum appropriate to the Hebrew diction can help readers sense something of the world quite different from ours... Continue Reading →

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In my experience, Christian apologetics is geared towards reinforcing the faithful, not convincing the skeptic. As I wrote last October, "It seems that pop-apologetics is nothing more than preaching to the choir."1 This in spite of the oft-repeated claim that apologetics is biblically mandated: "Always be ready to make your defense [apologian] to anyone who demands from... Continue Reading →

The Weekly Roundup – 10.26.18

Enjoy! Over on his blog, Bart Ehrman has a short post on the Lukan story of the rich man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31). Ehrman thinks that while the historical Jesus certain railed against the rich, calling them to repent before the impending reign of God upon the world, he doubts the parable of the rich... Continue Reading →

The Weekly Roundup – 10.19.18

The Weekly Roundup, ladies and gents! Bernard Lamborelle posted a response to @MiraScriptura's "Bernard Lamborelle vs. Mirror Reading" entitled "Facing cognitive dissonance." The humility exhibited in Lamborelle's piece is exemplary and it is refreshing to see two people with opposing views respond to one another's work without resorting to name-calling or strawmen. I would love... Continue Reading →

Michael D. Coogan: The First Stage in Bible Study

Michael D. Coogan, The Old Testament: A Historical and Literary Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures, third edition (Oxford University Press, 2014), 7. A necessary first stage in the study of the Bible is to determine what its actual text is. This is immensely difficult, because thousands of manuscripts need to be compared. Moreover, even before the... Continue Reading →

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