Category: Uncategorized

Bart Ehrman: Early Christian Scribes

Bart D. Ehrhman, The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings, sixth edition (OUP, 2016), 25.  In the earliest centuries, the vast majority of copyists of the New Testament books were not trained scribes. We know this because we can examine their… Continue Reading “Bart Ehrman: Early Christian Scribes”

Psych!

Well, not exactly. About a month ago I published “Final Post” which stated I was probably done blogging. I wrote that post while wrestling with a host of issues that was creating within me a very nihilistic attitude toward life and my work on… Continue Reading “Psych!”

Final Post

I’ve decided that this will probably be the final post on the blog. I’m tired and, to be honest, there are far more qualified people out in the blogosphere writing far better stuff reaching a wider audience. Rather than detract from their work by… Continue Reading “Final Post”

Michael D. Coogan: Some Books Went Through Multiple Editions

Michael D. Coogan, The Old Testament: A Historical and Literary Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures, third edition (Oxford University Press, 2014), 10-11. Although some ancient and most modern authors have produced single works that remain essentially unchanged, that was not the case with many books… Continue Reading “Michael D. Coogan: Some Books Went Through Multiple Editions”

Study of Christianity: Aram, Asaph, and Amos (2)

Yesterday I posted a link to the first of two videos from @StudyofChrist concerning the names Aram, Asaph, and Amos in the Matthean genealogy and the problems they pose. Today I am posting the second video in which @StudyofChrist deals with the problems of… Continue Reading “Study of Christianity: Aram, Asaph, and Amos (2)”

Study of Christianity: Aram, Asaph, and Amos (1)

Over on his YouTube channel, @StudyofChrist continues in his series interrogating the text of the Matthean genealogy. If you haven’t subscribed to his channel, you should do so. In this video, @StudyofChrist discusses the issue of three names: Aram (1:3), Asaph (1:7), and Amos… Continue Reading “Study of Christianity: Aram, Asaph, and Amos (1)”

Bart Ehrman: Canonical Questions

Bart D. Ehrman, The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings, sixth edition (Oxford University Press, 2016), 14. It appears then that our New Testament emerged out of the conflicts among Christian groups, and that the dominance of the proto-orthodox position was… Continue Reading “Bart Ehrman: Canonical Questions”

Robert Guelich on The Gospels as Portraits of Jesus

Every weekday I do about forty-five minutes of reading in the Greek text of Mark’s Gospel. After I finish reading through a pericope there are two main commentaries I go to for any insights that I as an amateur undoubtedly missed: the late R.T.… Continue Reading “Robert Guelich on The Gospels as Portraits of Jesus”

Michael D. Coogan: The First Stage in Bible Study

Michael D. Coogan, The Old Testament: A Historical and Literary Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures, third edition (Oxford University Press, 2014), 7. A necessary first stage in the study of the Bible is to determine what its actual text is. This is immensely difficult, because… Continue Reading “Michael D. Coogan: The First Stage in Bible Study”

Biblical Historical Context: Intro to Israelite Origins

Over at his blog Biblical Historical Context, Twitter user and all-around good guy @bibhistctxt has started a series exploring the complex and controversial subject of the origins of Israel. His main audience appears to be fellow Christians but even those who don’t believe will get… Continue Reading “Biblical Historical Context: Intro to Israelite Origins”