Weekly Roundup – 9.7.18

Here are a few good articles, blog posts, and podcasts I’ve been enjoying this week.

  • Twitter user and blogger @bibhistctxt continues his series on ancient Israelite origins with Israelite Origins: putting away childish things.” In this post, he shows that the various towns that were purportedly destroyed by the invading Israelite armies led by Joshua were not done in by those armies.
  • Nicholas Pelham’s piece in Lapham’s Quarterly entitled  A New Ark: What the marsh Arabs can teach us about Noah’s flood has some really interesting details on how a large boat designed to survive a regional flood would have needed to be constructed. And some “old-timers” recall a time when flood waters were so great that sometimes ended up floating on the water for a month before ending up on dry land. Amazing!
  • One of my favorite podcasts as of late has been New Testament Review, the work of two PhD candidates in New Testament at Duke University – Laura Robinson and Ian Mills. The duo review such classic works as Richard Burridge’s What Are the Gospels?, William Wrede’s The Messianic Secret, and more. It is a really great podcast and one I recommend if you are interested in the New Testament and the last century or so of scholarship on it.
  • Over on his YouTube channel, @StudyofChrist has been going through the genealogy in the Gospel of Matthew and I was recently able to watch his episode on the curse of Jeconiah and how that plays into the Matthean genealogy. It is a complicated issue but the solution he proposes is interesting.

Featured Image: Wikimedia Commons.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.